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BMW 5 SERIES Used Car Review

Pros

Cons

  • Traditionally excellent handling; traditionally good ride quality
  • Superb six-cylinder engines - old or new
  • Interior quality's big lift 2017 onwards
  • iDrive infotainment system has been a segment benchmark
  • Some four-cylinder turbo models expensive
  • Rear legroom not palatial
  • No all-wheel-drive option on regular models
  • Not the engaging driver's car it once was
This is general information and should not be relied on as purchasing advice.
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Overview of the Bmw 5

Overview of the Bmw 5

BMW 5 SERIES GENERATIONS (SINCE 1996)

1996-2003

2003-2010

2010-2017

2017 onwards

RUNNING COSTS

Fuel Consumption (2014 onwards)

2.0L 4-cylinder turbo diesel: 4.8 to 4.9 litres per 100km

3.0L 6-cylinder turbo diesel: 5.1 to 5.6 litres per 100km

2.0L 4-cylinder turbo: 6.2 litres per 100km

3.0L 6-cylinder turbo: 7.2 to 8.0 litres per 100km

4.4L V8: 9.9 to 10.5 litres per 100km

= Highly economical.

= Good economy.

= Average fuel use.

= Heavy consumption.

Servicing

BMW's Service Inclusive package for the 5 Series costs from about $1695, covering five years or 80,000km. BMW 5 Series parts and accessories can be found on Gumtree.

SIMILAR MODELS TO BMW 5 SERIES

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR: BMW 5 SERIES (2010 TO 2016)

Let's get something straight here: These are complex, sophisticated, expensive machines and unless you really know your way around them, an independent pre-purchase inspection is an absolute must.

It's not that the 5 Series is inherently faulty, but there's so much going on in one of these that you really need to call in an expert.

That said, there are a few things you can look for while whittling the short-list down.

That starts with a rattling noise from the turbo diesel engine that is often traced back to stretched timing chains.

This is seriously bad news on early versions of the turbo diesel as the whole engine has to be removed to replace the chains (they were at the back of the engine). In some cases, the crankshaft also had to be replaced as a result, meaning that a new motor was often a cheaper option.

The VANOS variable valve timing system can leak and fail. A check-engine light on the dash and/or a weep of oil at the front of the engine is the first clue. Again, this is an expensive fix.

The electric coolant pump on some variants can also fail leading to overheating. If this has occurred, there's a good chance the engine could be damaged beyond economical repair.