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TOYOTA TARAGO Used Car Review

The original, 1980s Toyota Tarago - known as the Space Cruiser in Japan - was simply a van with extra seats and windows, but became a dedicated, all-new people-mover from 1990. That model was famous for its egg-shape styling, though the latest model's wedge-style design has more in common with the original. While there have been several generations of the Tarago, the latest iteration has been going since 2006.

Pros

Cons

  • 8-seater capacity
  • Bigger, V6 engine offers good power
  • 2nd and 3rd row accessibility (2001 onwards)
  • General reliability, even of earlier models
  • Not that affordable for families on tighter budgets
  • 1990s Tarago had only one sliding door for access to rear cabin
  • Latest model's four-cylinder engine provides only adequate performance
  • Latest-generation Tarago was released back in 2006
This is general information and should not be relied on as purchasing advice.
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Overview of the Toyota Tarago

Overview of the Toyota Tarago

The original, 1980s Toyota Tarago - known as the Space Cruiser in Japan - was simply a van with extra seats and windows, but became a dedicated, all-new people-mover from 1990.

That model was famous for its egg-shape styling, though the latest model's wedge-style design has more in common with the original.

While there have been several generations of the Tarago, the latest iteration has been going since 2006.

TOYOTA TARAGO GENERATIONS (SINCE 2000)

2000-2006

2006 on

RUNNING COSTS

Fuel Consumption

2.4L 4-cylinder: 8.9 to 9.5 litres per 100km

3.5L V6: 10.2 to 10.3 litres per 100km

= Highly economical.

= Good economy.

= Average fuel use.

= Heavy consumption.

Servicing

SIMILAR MODELS TO TOYOTA TARAGO

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR: TOYOTA TARAGO (2006 ON)

As with any people-mover, the first thing to check is that the interior has not been trashed by kids, dogs, prams and mountain bikes.

Make sure all the electricals work and that things like the power-window switches aren't full of melted ice-cream or biscuit crumbs.

Mechanically, the biggest potential glitch is an example with the 2.4-litre engine that is consuming oil.

This has been a bit of a theme globally for this engine, and it often starts around the 100,00km mark and will gradually get worse. The problem is in the piston-and-ring assemblies and it usually requires a full engine rebuild to sort.

So be very wary of any Tarago that hits the second-hand market with 100,000 or 120,000km showing on the odometer. A compression and leak-down test, performed by a qualified service centre, should provide the answers you're looking for.