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HOLDEN UTE Used Car Review

Pros

Cons

  • Better ride and handling than a dual-cab ute
  • Rapid performance of V8 model
  • Reliability has improved over the years
  • An Australian icon
  • Windscreen pillar can obstruct vision
  • V8 engines consume plenty of fuel
  • Doesn't have load capacity of workhorse-style utes
  • No longer in production
This is general information and should not be relied on as purchasing advice.
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Overview of the Holden Ute

Overview of the Holden Ute

HOLDEN UTE GENERATIONS (SINCE 2000)

2000-2006

2007-2013

2013-2017

RUNNING COSTS

Fuel Consumption

3.6L V6: 9.0 to 9.1 litres per 100km

6.2L V8: 12.8 to 12.9 litres per 100km

= Highly economical.

= Good economy.

= Average fuel use.

= Heavy consumption.

Servicing

SIMILAR MODELS TO HOLDEN UTE

Ford Falcon Ute

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR: HOLDEN UTE (2014 ONWARDS)

Mechanically, the Ute is a Commodore, so it's strong and reliable. Check V8s for oil leaks and noisy lifters. V6s could have noisy timing chains.

The most important check is to find out what kind of previous life the Ute has had. Many were worked hard on fleets and by commercial operators, so check the service record.

The condition of the tray can tell you lots about a ute's history. If it's scratched and dented, it's certainly seen some action. Is there a big tow bar fitted?

The interior can tell tales, too. Are there holes drilled in the dashboard or centre console for an electronic dispatcher or radio that has since been removed?

Sportier V8 models were often modified, so make sure any aftermarket wheels, tyres, suspension and exhaust systems are legal and roadworthy. Insurance companies take a dim view of modifications like these, too.