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HOLDEN COMMODORE BERLINA Used Car Review

The Berlina replaced the SL/X badge to represent a mid-range Commodore model. It aimed to provide a good level of features and luxury without treading on the toes of the upmarket Calais variant. The nameplate was dropped in 2013 - replaced, along with the Omega, by a new variant called Evoke.

Pros

Cons

  • Tidy handling and good ride quality
  • Worthy equipment extras and safety features
  • Generous rear-seat space and comfortable seats all round
  • Improved fuel economy with 3.0-litre V6
  • 3.0-litre V6's lack of torque and indecisive auto
  • A-pillar impedes forward vision
  • Interior let down by some hard plastics
  • V8 option wasn't available on models beyond 2009
This is general information and should not be relied on as purchasing advice.
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Overview of the Holden Berlina

Overview of the Holden Berlina

The Berlina replaced the SL/X badge to represent a mid-range Commodore model.

It aimed to provide a good level of features and luxury without treading on the toes of the upmarket Calais variant.

The nameplate was dropped in 2013 - replaced, along with the Omega, by a new variant called Evoke.

HOLDEN COMMODORE BERLINA GENERATIONS (SINCE 1997)

1997-2006

2006-2013

RUNNING COSTS

Fuel Consumption

3.6L V6/LPG: 11.8 to 14.2 litres per 100km (due to low price of LPG fuel)

3.0L V6: 8.9 litres per 100km

3.6L V6 (discontinued 2010): 10.1 to 10.6 litres per 100km

6.0L V8 (discontinued 2010): 12.9 litres per 100km

= Highly economical.

= Good economy.

= Average fuel use.

= Heavy consumption.

Servicing

SIMILAR MODELS TO HOLDEN COMMODORE BERLINA

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR: HOLDEN COMMODORE BERLINA (2006-2013)

Quality was a big improvement in this model Berlina, with much better fit and finish inside the cabin. Even so, check that everything electrical works properly.

Check discolouration around the headliner for signs that the (optional) sunroof is leaking.

The V8 engine was pretty well sorted by this stage (before being dropped in 2010), but it's still worth starting it from cold and listening for the ticking sound of a dud hydraulic lifter. Check for oil leaks, too.

The V6 engine also needs a sharp ear, mainly to detect signs of a stretched (and rattling) timing chain. While some engines suffered chain-stretch at low kilometres and have been fixed, others seem to develop it later in life.

It's a big, expensive job to put right, so have it checked by an expert if in any doubt.

The V6 also has a habit of developing sludge in its intake tract and this needs to be cleaned out manually. The first sign of this is sluggish performance, difficult starting, erratic idling or a 'check-engine' light illuminating.