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NISSAN 200SX Used Car Review

Pros

Cons

  • A bit of a sports car bargain
  • Engaging, rear-drive handling
  • S15 model's slick-shifting six-speed manual
  • Turbo engine's punchy, high-rev performance
  • Engine noise quality dipped at higher revs
  • Rear cabin tight for adults
  • Tyre noise on coarse surfaces
  • Handling not foolproof for inexperienced drivers
This is general information and should not be relied on as purchasing advice.
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  • Common FAQs
  • The maximum power of a Nissan 200SX is 147 kW with maximum torque of 265 Nm.
  • The Nissan 200SX has been reported to reach top speeds of up to 235 km/hour and is capable of accelerating from 0 to 100 km/hour in about 7.1 seconds.
  • All Nissan 200SX models are rear-wheel drive, with both automatic and manual transmissions available.
  • The Nissan 200SX is the name given to the Nissan Silvia S14 and S15 variants for the Australian market. Other generations of the Nissan Silvia are known by different names.
  • Nissan 200SX models from 1995 to 1998 will cost around $15,000, with the later models produced from 1999 to 2002 fetching more than $20,000.

Overview of the Nissan 200

Overview of the Nissan 200

NISSAN 200SX GENERATIONS

1994-2000

2000-2002

RUNNING COSTS

Fuel Consumption

2.0L 4-cylinder turbo: 8.2 to 9.0 litres per 100km

= Highly economical.

= Good economy.

= Average fuel use.

= Heavy consumption.

Servicing

SIMILAR MODELS TO NISSAN 200SX

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR: NISSAN 200SX (2000-2002)

Generally a tough customer, the 200SX has one major problem area to be aware of.

And it's not an actual fault with the car per se, it's more to do with those servicing it not really knowing what they're doing.

The slinky shape of the Nissan means that the top tank of the radiator is not the highest point on the cooling system.

So, simply filling the radiator from there and hoping for the best is not good enough as air can become trapped in the coolant passageways, leading to hot-spots.

The way to avoid this is to carefully bleed the cooling system whenever the level is topped up or the coolant itself is changed.

If hot-spots have been allowed to exist and the car driven, it's conceivable that severe damage to the cylinder head could occur.

So check the oil for signs of milkiness that indicates a blown head gasket, or have what's known as a TK test performed by a mechanic.